Kate Erickson Interview Transcription

Kate Erickson:
The first time somebody asked me to be on their podcast, I was like ‘Yeah, let me go ahead and forward this to John for you.’ They were like ‘No no no, I want you on my podcast!’ I was like – ‘Why??’
Harry Duran:
PODCAST JUNKIES. EPISODE 34.
And we are live from the Major Deegan Expressway in New York City, which is where I happen to be testing out a recording from ATR2100 into the Apple Camera Adapter, I think it’s called. It’s a USB lightning adapter, and I’m recording this straight into the Voice Memo app on the phone. Assuming I don’t get any strange looks from folks driving next to me on the Highway, wondering why I’m holding up a microphone, I’ll probably go with this as just something to test out.
I think part of the challenge is always trying to find the right time, if this is not something you’re doing full-time, and to get in the intros, the recordings themselves – not to mention the editing and the posting, so it’s a challenge. I’m sure a lot of you that have started podcasting probably feel this crunch, especially as your show progresses and you realize there’s a lot of moving parts. That’s something I just wanted to try, because I’ve been meaning to get this intro recorded for an interview that I actually recorded probably a couple of weeks ago. I realized that I’m the bottleneck in this process. I’m assuming this is a bit too much information, but if you have questions about this, or you resonate with this topic, then shoot me a note so I know I’m not alone here, losing my mind.
Anyways, we’re talking to Kate Erickson today. Kate is really fantastic and warm and engaging and a really likable person. I know that sounds like a weird collection of adjectives, but I think it describes her. From the first time I met her, I realized that she’s the type of person that goes out of her way to make you feel like someone that she wants to have a conversation with. She’s the partner of John Lee Dumas of Entrepreneur On Fire, and she actually plays a big role in that organization and in that enterprise, getting the blog posts up and a lot of the other stuff, a couple of which she touches upon in this interview.
I think what I really wanted to do it speak to her about her foray into podcasting, which is why I have her on the show. Her podcast is called ‘Kate’s Take’, and she what she’s done is take excerpts from some blog posts that she’s done and some topics on how to get your project off the ground and tips that she had blogged about previously. Now she’s repurposing that content into the podcast episodes. I think she’s done a fantastic job, sh’s had a couple of episodes that I thought were really spot on and that I had to re-post because I think the content she was parroting was really valuable.
To be honest, I hadn’t read those posts that she was referring to, so it just goes to show you that you have to think about delivery of your content from a bunch of different perspectives. People that like to read blog posts might not be the same people who like to listen to your podcast. Give them the content in as many avenues as possible, and you’ll be surprised at how many new folks you have checking out your content. So I hope you enjoy this episode, and as always, feedback at the website, www.PodcastJunkies.com
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This episode is brought to you by PRDCNF. Yes, I’m still on the Highway. Yes, I’m still trying out this new recording, and I’m trying to be as productive as possible while I’m on the road. Needless to say, that’s a topic that’s always top for me, and it’s something that I’ve really paid close attention to as I started my podcast and as I put together some other endeavors that will be coming out in the next couple of months.
Along the way, I’ve learned to follow and pay close attention to people who do this for a living, who talk about this, who blog about this, and also just as importantly, demonstrate that they understand the importance of productivity by virtue of how successful they’ve been in their career or in their business.
You’ll notice that the Conference is one day. It’s a single-track intensive, that’s how I like to think about it. I think of it as an opportunity for you to get the collective knowledge of the 8-9 speakers that I’m going to have there, and just get as much value as you can out of having them in the room. It’s a conference that I wanted to go to myself, and I didn’t see one out there, which is why I created it. This is really a passion project for me; it’s the biggest endeavor I’ve ever taken on in my entrepreneurial journey, and I’m really passionate about the fact that I want you to get 10X value out of having these folks there. These are folks like Mike Vardy, folks like Jordan Harbinger, Jayson Gaignard, Natalie Sisson – people that are super successful and have demonstrated that they understand the magic formula for being successful and getting things done. And they do it in a way that is not about learning what’s the latest tip or latest trick, because that’s not what the conference is about.
It’s about being in a room and being motivated by the speakers that are there, because they operate at a level that you want to be at, for whatever purpose you can think of. The other thing is having people in the room with you, seated at the table next to you, who understand the value of attending a conference like this – who are successful in their own right and just want to take their business or their product or their service or their company to the next level. They always try and improve themselves.
Personally, those are the types of people that I want to be around. I want to be around people who are not content with the status quo and as much as they’ve learned, feel that there’s always room to learn more. Those are the types of people that really really motivate me. Those are the five folks that I want to have closest to me. Those are the people that I feel will take my business, personally, to the next level, and I’m super excited to have this event. I’m really excited for you folks to be there and I think you’ll really get a ton of value out of it. Go to the website, register for the conference, I guarantee you won’t be disappointed. The site is www.PRDCNF.com, or I created a URL that’s a bit easier to remember: www.DowntownProductivity.com.
If you are someone that’s actually listening to this as a fan of Podcast Junkies, I want to make sure that you guys get tremendous value out of this. Now what I’m doing is especially for people that are listening to the podcast – only you guys – I created a special coupon code that will give you a discount. It’s a big discount and it’s something I’m going to do for my loyal listeners of the show. Head on over to the site and when you check out, type in the coupon code – HARRYSENTME, and that’s my token of appreciation for you because I think, as a listener to this podcast, you already understand the importance of listening to conversations of successful podcasters. A couple of podcasters will be speakers – Mike Vardy, Jordan Harbinger, Natalie Sisson, of course – but there’s other folks, Ilon and Guy Ferdman of Satori Prime, and there’s other folks there who have other businesses that are just as successful. It’s my gift to you, thanks for listening. I won’t let this go on any further; I’ll let you get on to our interview with the lovely Kate Erickson.
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Harry:
So, Kate Erickson, thank you so much for coming on Podcast Junkies.
Kate Erickson:
Harry, thank you for bringing me on Podcast Junkies, I’m excited to be here.
Harry:
I’m excited to have you. This is not just purely online conversation, we’ve actually met in real life and we’ve hung out, so that’s been a lot of fun.
Kate:
Yeah, I totally agree. I want to know if we’re going to do that again in 2015? I hope so!
Harry:
I saw that you posted the Conferences To Attend This Year; probably Podcast Movement is one where we might meet up, because I don’t think you guys are going to make it to NMX?
Kate:
Yes, that is correct, we will not be going to NMX. But definitely Podcast Movement, and then will you be going to Social Media Marketing World?
Harry:
That’s in March, right?
Kate:
Mhmm.
Harry:
In San Diego?
Kate:
San Diego, uh-huh.
Harry:
Everything’s in San Diego.
Kate:
Right! Of course!
Harry:
I think I’m going to try. What are the dates on that?
Kate:
It is mid-March. I actually want to say it’s the last week in March.
Harry:
Okay.
Kate:
Yeah, I have a calendar behind me so I keep turning around and looking at it. It’s March 25th, 26th and 27th.
Harry:
Is that the NEUYER calendar?
Kate:
Oh no, I think it’s just something that I found on Amazon. It’s probably not as fancy as that.
Harry:
Yeah, I think Mike Vardy turned me on to that. I actually bought it myself – it’s www.NEUYER.net, and it’s awesome. You can do it landscape or vertical, and it’s laminated, so you can write with it like a whiteboard.
Kate:
Yeah. If I zoomed in to the camera right now so that you could see what that looked like, you could tell that I can’t erase stuff and correct stuff. I started using Sharpies because before I was just using pens, and then I’d make a mistake and so I’d use a Sharpie that denotes that that is for real. Hopefully it won’t change again!
Harry:
So there’s different levels of commitment? There’s pencil, pen, and then Sharpie means there’s no way that’s going to change.
Kate:
Yeah, I hope so, otherwise I need a new calendar.
Harry:
I was at my parents’ house and my niece was like ‘Oh, I want to show you a new trick’. It was like a whiteboard and she wrote on it with a Sharpie, and then she wrote on it with a dry-erase on top, and then (I think I got the order of that right), and then if you erase it, it erases the Sharpie underneath.
Kate:
Wow! That’s actually an excellent tip!
Harry:
I was like ‘That’s cool’ and she was all excited.
Kate:
Awesome.
Harry:
So how’s the podcasting been for you? I know you’re above 50 episodes now, right?
Kate:
Yeah, just very recently I crossed 50, which was really exciting. It’s funny because in my 50th episode, I was like ‘Yay, thank you guys so much for helping me get to 50’, and then I was like ‘Wow, I feel like I just said this a couple of episodes ago’ – it was ‘Thanks for helping me get to 45′. It’s exciting as landmarks. I think sometimes we get so involved in the creation of our content and continuing that consistency that when you actually stop and say ’50 episodes’, I actually was like wow, 50 episodes is a lot. That’s a big commitment, as you know – a time commitment.
It’s definitely helpful, I’ve found a topic-based podcast where I’m just on the mic by myself – I’ve got to hand it out to interviewers because I can’t even imagine. I don’t have to worry about scheduling, I don’t have to worry about re-scheduling. I don’t know if that’s a huge issue for you or not as an interviewer, but I guess the trade-off is that I have to create all the content myself, so there’s a little give and take there.
But yeah, the podcast is going great. I’m having a lot of fun and it’s actually just a really cool experience to continue to uncover what it is that people resonate with most. That’s so fascinating to me because no matter how well you think you know your audience, or no matter how good you think you are at a particular subject, creating content and getting feedback is just such a lesson to be learned.
Harry:
Yeah.
Kate:
I’m constantly getting feedback about stuff and I just really love hearing what resonates with people most. I’m learning so much in the process.
Harry:
I think what’s fascinating is the dynamic that you have with your audience. When everyone starts, you’re talking into a microphone in your room, in your office, in your home, and you feel like you’re talking to yourself, and you’re like ‘Is anyone listening to this? What am I doing this for? Who am I doing this for?’ 
I know John talked about the avatar, and I’m sure that played a part in you figuring out who your audience was that you were talking to.
Kate:
Big time. I’ve heard from a lot of people ‘Oh, it must have been really easy for you to start your podcast since you have Entrepreneur On Fire behind you’. I don’t think that John has ever talked about ‘Kate’s Take’ on Entrepreneur On Fire. I think people have a misperception that I’m using the Entrepreneur On Fire brand. I’d be kind of silly not to, so of course I’m doing that in some respects, but just in terms of figuring all that out on my own, I’m having to do all of that. My avatar is not the same avatar that John has for his podcast, so absolutely. I had to go through all of those steps with ‘Kate’s Take’, for sure.
Harry:
So what’s been the biggest surprise for you? You’ve talked about it a couple of times – you came from a world that was nothing like the world you guys live in now with online marketing and podcasting and running a course to teach people how to podcast. I would venture to say that 2-3 years ago, a lot of this stuff was probably something you hadn’t even thought of.
Kate:
Definitely true. There is so much that I’m doing today that I never would have thought of. I think what kind of surprises me the most is that you can have a conversation with somebody in everyday life and they still don’t know what a podcast is. There’s a lot of people who don’t know what a podcast is, and to think that we’ve built an entire business around it and the lifestyle that we have right now because of a podcast…
I was really inspired the other day, I don’t know if it was something that someone said to me or just a train of thought I was going off on, but I opened up a document and the first thing I wrote was ‘How a podcast changed my life’. Not only for my perspective because of what the business that John and I have built has done for me, but what I see it doing for thousands and thousands of other people every single day. It surprises me.
Like you said, a couple of years ago, I didn’t even really know that entrepreneurship was an option for me, let alone entrepreneurship based on a podcast. I didn’t know what a podcast was a couple of years ago either. That’s been very eye-opening – some things that you just never even imagined are reality if you want them to be.
Harry:
It’s so funny because we’re in this world, and I basically dove head-first into it from the moment I attended New Media Expo in January of 2014, and it’s been like a whirlwind since then. I’d listened to podcasts previously, but just music podcasts. I’m a DJ, I love making music, and for me, a podcast was just music. The concept that it could be people speaking, and you could learn from it was really fascinating. I was talking to a friend yesterday and he’s looking to get started. He was like ‘Yeah, I’ve heard one or two’, but you sort of forget that when we’re at the conferences and we’re on our shows and we’re talking to other people, we think everyone in the world is podcasting!
Kate:
Yes!
Harry:
We’re like ‘Everyone knows about this’ and you have an idea and you think that everyone else has that idea. It’s funny because I’m talking to him, and it’s funny when you talk to people who are not into it, but they want to and they’re really excited. I’m like ‘Yeah, just jump into it and get started’, and there are all the other things that we tell people like: Don’t think too much.
He’s like ‘I have an idea, but don’t tell anyone.’ I laughed at him because I was like ‘Dude, you’ve really got to understand that this idea of stealing your idea is really not going to happen because you’re going to tell 100 people your idea, and maybe 1 person would actually say ‘Yeah, that’s something I would want to do’. The rest of the people just talk a lot of BS and are like ‘Yeah, I’ll do that’, but a lot of the time, people are not going to have the desire or the drive to make a business or make a go out of it.
Kate:
Yeah, taking action is obviously the number one thing. That always amazes me too. I get emails from people and they’re like ‘I really want to talk about this business idea in the Facebook community, but I’m kind of scared that if I talk about the domain that I’m looking for, that maybe somebody else is going to buy it.’
I was like: ‘Wow, this mindset..’ Some people just don’t know, and if you’re coming into this space and you just don’t know yet, I just think it’s sad that there’s that scarcity mindset that would actually lead someone to believe that they can’t go to their community and ask for feedback because they’re scared that somebody else is going to steal their idea.
That belief that there’s room for everyone and that all ships rise in a high tide. I want more people to get on board with that!
Harry:
It’s funny because if you think about the population of people that live in this country and the people that are able to have maybe disposable income to start something like this, or the drive, that population is really really huge. I think we’re only dealing with a small portion of it, and I think that sometimes we’re so immersed in it that we think that everyone must be thinking the same thing.
I think on one of your last episodes, you talked about squashing doubt as well, right?
Kate:
Yeah. I think actually on my most recent episode, it’s something that everybody struggles with. Everybody deals with that, no matter what niche or what industry or whether you’re an entrepreneur, not an entrepreneur. That’s just human beings. Of course it holds so many people back, but it doesn’t have to. If you understand how to approach it and how to overcome it, even in a few situations versus no situations at all, you’re going to be five steps ahead of somebody else.
Harry:
It’s funny how we can grow really quickly with a podcast because even myself, I find by virtue of repetition, you interview people, you interview people, you see things that you could have asked and that you didn’t, or you fumble and you say ‘What was it about that specific interview that I could have done better?’ It’s almost like a sports player – the more he plays, the more shots he takes and the more he’s going to refine his skill. Given that you’re up to 50 so far, have you seen, even in that period of time, how your skills as a podcaster have changed?
Kate:
So drastically. It reminds me, too, of even before I started my podcast – the first interview I did on somebody else’s podcast was the worst. It was so bad! But yeah, that’s true of anything. It’s pretty amazing that with podcasting, it’s very obvious. You liken this to a sports player, and what does every sports player’s coach make them do after the game? You watch tape. You watch yourself make those mistakes, you see how you missed that pass or you see what a bad idea it was for you to try to throw the ball behind your back, or whatever it might be. As a podcaster, sometimes I feel kind of weird when I listen to my own episodes.
Have you ever taken off your iPhone and been like ‘Oh, I don’t want anyone to see that I’m listening to my own podcast right now’. But it’s so incredibly helpful, and I think that’s why I’ve been able to make such – well, I hope, and I believe I’ve made really far strides in a pretty short period of time with podcasting. I’ve listened to myself and when you’re recording, you don’t really realize how stiff you sound or how scripted you sound, and when you go back and listen to it, you’re like ‘Wow, I really need to loosen up a lot’, and that’s something especially from doing an audio blog, it’s really easy to get into the rhythm of just reading my posts. That’s what’s easiest. That’s how I felt most comfortable in the beginning, but now after listening to how unconnectiony that sounds – I don’t know what the right word for that is..
Harry:
Unconnected, maybe?
Kate:
Yeah, so I feel like I’ve definitely improved a ton since I started.
Harry:
I interviewed Srinivas Rao, and he makes it a point to go back, specifically for the points we just mentioned, to listen to his interviews. In his mind, there’s no other way in which he’s going to improve his skills as an interviewer if he doesn’t – to your point – watch the game tape. He listens and he’s like ‘Oh man, I should have pushed on this question more with this topic’, or ‘I should have probed deeper’ or ‘I could have asked the question another way’, or ‘I wasn’t on my A-game’.
It’s the first time I heard it referenced as a Monday-morning quarterback, if you will, but I think it’s fantastic. I think I probably should do more than I do now, but it’s really important if, in fact, we want to improve our skills as podcasters.
Kate:
Yeah, absolutely. I think it’s really important to listen to yourself, but I think it’s also important to listen to other podcasts. I love listening to other topic-based podcasts, and especially if they’re people I look up to and I enjoy their content and I enjoy the way that they connect with their audience. I can learn from them too. I can learn a lot from the way that they structure their shows, or different techniques or tactics that they might use for engagement on their show, their calls to action. Following other podcasters who are doing what you want to be doing, as a topic-based show or an interviewer- if you look up to an interviewer in the space, then you should absolutely be listening to their podcasts to see how it is that they interact with their guests and with their audience.
Harry:
Some of the things that I’ve been consciously aware of is people that have been doing this for their career, like Larry King or Charlie Rose. I think I’ve been more aware of paying attention to how they handle interviews because I think it’s fascinating what order viagra online us they do and they’re obviously the masters of what they do. I think it’s really really important. It’s not just podcasters; active interviewing in itself is a skill.
Kate:
For sure. I think there’s a lot to be learned from people that don’t really, on the surface, seem like they’re in this space necessarily – maybe they don’t have a podcast – but the principles of what you’re doing in communicating with people and being a good interviewer, absolutely.
Harry:
It’s funny because you were first on podcasts because people wanted to find out more about the woman behind the man.
Kate:
Exactly. That’s exactly how it started. They were like ‘Let’s get behind the scenes!’
Harry:
I’m trying to remember who it was, but I know Dave Jackson had you on as well.
Kate:
Yeah. Oh, I loved it, that was such a fun podcast.
Harry:
I had Dave on, he’s a blast, he’s so much fun.
Kate:
Yeah, I’m actually really glad that he invited me on. I was so honored to be invited on his podcast, I never really thought that Dave would be like ‘Hey, I listen to your podcast’. I was like ‘What?? That’s awesome!’
Harry:
So obviously in the beginning you said you were nervous because it was the first time people were interviewing you. It must have felt strange the first time you were on, even though you knew you guys were having success with Entrepreneur On Fire and Podcasters’ Paradise. I imagine it felt strange for someone to be actually interviewing you and asking you questions.
Kate:
The first time somebody asked me to be on their podcast, I was like ‘Yeah, let me go ahead and forward this to John for you.’ They were like ‘No no no, I want YOU on my podcast!’ I was like – ‘Why??’ I didn’t really get it. But yeah, I think there’s a lot to be said of everything that goes on behind the scenes, especially for people who may not excel in that behind-the-scenes type of work. I think it’s important for podcasters to understand what it takes behind the scenes to run a successful business, to run a successful podcast. You can be amazing at interviewing and setting up a website, but there’s a lot more that goes in to actually growing an audience and creating a community and creating a brand.
Once I kind of looked at it from that respect, I was like ‘Okay, this is pretty cool’, and it really helped me step out. Behind the scenes, two years ago was the perfect way to describe me in every aspect of my life. I didn’t want to be in the spotlight, I wasn’t comfortable with people looking to me or turning to me for answers because I didn’t want to give people the wrong answers. I very much played that role in everything that I did, and for people to come to me and actually show me that they valued the expertise and the skills and the knowledge that I have has helped me so much in my journey. It’s priceless that that has been opened up for me, so I’m really grateful for that.
Harry:
I was wondering because you touched upon the fact that you’d never specifically sought out the spotlight before, and in terms of being recognized for the work that you’re doing – was that an aspect of positions that you had previous to joining John?
Kate:
I think that that was definitely a big part of it. I think that a big part of it, though, was mindset. It was my mindset around doubting myself, not having a lot of confidence. I don’t necessarily think that it was the roles that I had in my previous jobs; I think it was more the way that I saw myself. Until I gave myself permission to share the knowledge that I have and to really believe that I did have important stuff to say, it wasn’t until I was able to make that mindset shift that I was really able to step out and do that.
There’s a lot of parallels, of course, in the previous jobs that I had. I was in admin-level positions for a lot of my career, and that’s not very confidence boosting. I sat at a job for 3 and a half years without a single promotion and I was at the lowest position that I could have been in there, so that was a little disheartening.
Harry:
Yeah.
Kate:
So yeah, I think that that played a role, but I think the biggest part of it was mindset.
Harry:
Do you think that having gone through those experiences and having been in those positions – I’ve been in corporate America for a long time as well, so I’ve seen what happens in terms of motivation to people when they feel like their contribution is not being recognized. We’ve seen that ourselves, and then we’ve probably seen it in people that we know. Have you been able to translate what your experience in transitioning to your work and your role as an entrepreneur to feed back or advice to friends of yours?
Kate:
Yes, definitely. It wasn’t, again, until I gave myself permission to understand. When I was on my corporate job, I was waiting for somebody else to give something to me. I thought that if I was doing everything that my boss told me to do and I was fulfilling my job responsibilities and I was working hard – I’m a very driven, motivated person – so I thought that if I was checking all those boxes, somebody was just going to hand me what I was looking for. Once I was able to recognize and understand that nobody else was going to give that to me, that’s when I took my entrepreneurial leap – finally! I finally understood that it was up to me to make that happen.
I’ve definitely been able to share that story with a lot of people, and I think really help them understand that you don’t become an entrepreneur just because you have a great business idea and you quit your corporate job. That is work that you need to do, time that you need to put in and drive and motivation that you need to be giving yourself. You also need to seek out communities and networking events and conferences, and it’s about surrounding yourself with like-minded people for that support. That’s definitely integral too. I’ve absolutely felt through sharing that story of when I was able to have that mindset shift, that I need to be the one to take action and do this. Nobody else is going to do it for me. I hope that that helps other people realize that there’s a lot of work to be done as an entrepreneur, but you definitely have that support system from online communities and from attending conferences, like you’d mentioned before.
Harry:
Yeah. I think it’s so important. When I used to have folks that reported in to me, we would do a bi-weekly review and I would tell them that I’m only 50% responsible for the growth of your career. I was trying to put the onus on them to say ‘You’ve got to take responsibility for determining where you want to see yourself in 2-3 years’. For some people it resonated, for some people it didn’t. I think to your point, it’s a mindset. Sometimes you don’t know what you don’t know, and if you’re stuck in that role and you don’t see other people around you that can motivate you or inspire you, to show you that there’s a different path, you’ll just stay there forever.
I think that’s why this community that we’re in is so valuable, and these conferences that we attend. Personally, for myself, I’m surrounding myself and continuing to surround myself with folks that literally operate at another level that I didn’t know existed. These 6-figure/7-figure earners – their concept and relationship to money, how they value services, how they price services. It’s a complete, complete mind-shift and a lot of the stuff is crazy because I felt like I’d been in a cave prior to that! I didn’t know that this existed, but it’s almost like having known now, it completely changes the way you approach the things you do as an entrepreneur.
Kate:
Yeah, definitely. To your point of maybe in the corporate world, you’re not really seeing anyone around you doing things that you’re like ‘Oh man, I’ve got to get up on that level’ – we get comfortable, and that’s the worst thing that we could be. What I’ve found in jumping into the entrepreneurial space and talking about the people in these communities and who we’re surrounding ourselves with, and being so inspired and motivated by this next level of achievement and success that’s trying to be lived. That’s getting out of your comfort zone. Having other people along with you, doing that, makes a huge difference.
Harry:
Yeah. I think it’s really important and I think the more we’re involved in the space, the more we can see the potential of building relationships. I’ve been a huge proponent of networking recently – probably without labeling it prior to that, but more so recently understanding the importance and the power of connecting with people that are like-minded and on the same path. They’re not trying to take you down; they’re there to support you. In a corporate world, sometimes, you’re reserved about who you want to work with or who you want to give your new idea to. We’ve all had bosses that take credit for your idea, and that sucks.
The interesting thing about the communities that I’ve found with podcasting and with the conferences is that it’s very, very supportive.
Kate:
Yeah, and that’s what is so inspiring and motivating. Every single day in Podcasters’ Paradise is like how in it people are to help each other, and that’s exactly how we built the community. I could not be more grateful and blessed for the people we’ve attracted to the Podcasters’ Paradise community. Every single one of them feels that way; they want to help each other, they want to lift each other up, and that’s really really cool to see.
Harry:
I’m going to change gears for a little bit, but how’s this been for you personally? I know that there’s been a whirlwind of attention on you guys, and with interviews and appearances and connections. I know you recently posted about Tim Ferriss re-posting one of your blog posts. Just personally, how has that been for you in terms of the exposure you guys have been getting so far?
Kate:
Incredibly humbling. When I saw that Tim Ferriss had shared a blog post, and when I see us mentioned in Forbes and on Inc.com, and Time Magazine, it’s so humbling to know that we’re having this big of an impact on people. People are listening, we’re helping people and we’re helping people achieve what it is that we’ve achieved, through the experience of us achieving it. We have a long way to go – I certainly don’t see us at the top of our game right now. I think it’s a journey that we’re very much enjoying every step of the way, but it’s definitely very motivating and reassuring to see these types of mentions. The hard work that we put in, all the time that we invest, the sacrifices that John and I make every single day to be able to create what we create.
It’s all so worth it when you get that email from someone in your community, saying that you’ve changed their life. Or on Podcasters’ Paradise when someone says that they’ve landed a sponsor or in Webinar On Fire, when somebody tells us they’ve made $10k on a webinar. That kind of stuff is just as motivating as the Time and Inc and Forbes mentions. Of course, it’s great for our credibility and authority to have a spread on different mediums like that, but it’s all very, very humbling.
Harry:
Yeah. I’m interested because you’re an integral part of the Entrepreneur On Fire brand, but I want to make sure this conversation stays about you. From your perspective, what do you think are going to be some of the biggest challenges for you personally as you look to the upcoming year?
Kate:
Well, I think continuing to really push myself out of my comfort zone. I talked about behind the scenes being kind of the life that I lived in every respect possible, and that’s still something that I definitely struggle with. Being on the podcast, having my own podcast has really helped a lot. I’ve started taking on speaking engagements, which two years ago, I would have never ever ever ever considered. It’s very exciting, but it’s absolutely still super scary for me. I know that I need to continue pushing myself and getting myself out of my comfort zone, which obviously isn’t easy. I still have fear and doubt creep in every single day.
Luckily, I have surrounded myself with the right kind of people and we have an amazing community, and they’re the ones that help me get past all that fear and everything. But that doesn’t mean that it’s not still a struggle. I’ll continue to try to push the limits in every way that I can, and I know that every time I’m able to break through another thing that scares me, or break through another level of discomfort that I’m only making myself better and as an extension, I’m able to help other people do the same thing. That’s really what I’m all about.
I’m willing to fail and fall down and be scared and get out of my comfort zone because I want to be able to take what I learned and teach that to other people so that they can do the same thing.
Harry:
That’s really inspiring. I think it’s a function of who you are as a person, and I tend to be a good reader of people, I think, when I first meet them. I work a lot off of just vibes and energy, so I think when we first met, I could tell that you were a genuine person. You know, you meet someone and they put up a front and they seem to have – maybe you heard them on a podcast and they sound one way, but then you meet them and you’re like ‘That’s not the person from the show!’
Kate:
Yeah, not a good thing.
Harry:
That is a really an awkward moment.
Kate:
Yeah, like maybe I’m not thinking that you’re the right person.
Harry:
’Do you have a twin that does a podcast?’ I’m sure your close friends would say that it’s your genuine personality – it’s who you are and who we now hear on the podcast, and who we’ve heard through your words on the blog, that’s who you are in real life. That’s why I shouldn’t be surprised that people meet you and find that you’re outgoing and genuine and warm and caring, because that’s who you really are.
Kate:
That’s really really awesome. Thank you for that. I feel the same way about you specifically, Harry, because I feel like a lot of the time when I meet people, I’m trying to play up an energy. Every time I find myself doing something that I think I should be doing, I’m like ‘This just doesn’t feel right’. I learned a long time ago that you just need to ditch that game. Being who you are is the only way that you’re going to stand out.
We all have unique personalities and experiences, and finding out – whether it be through a personality test or going and talking to the five people that are closest to you to really get a good feel for what your strongest qualities are and how you can stand out from the rest of the people that are launching podcasts, launching blogs, launching businesses. That’s a really powerful part of growing your brand. I’m lucky to have discovered that a while back, because it’s just uncomfortable not to be yourself.
Harry:
It’s so much work too, right?
Kate:
Right! Yeah. You can have twice as much energy!
Harry:
Yeah because you’ve got to put up this front and you have to think about the people that you have to put the front up to and the people you didn’t, and you’re like ‘Okay, which face did I show to this person on this day?’ and then at the end of the day, it’s just too much work. Like you said, that’s why I resonate more with the people that I’ve heard on shows where you can tell that they’re real and genuine – they curse whenever they want to and they say what’s on their mind, or they go through a particularly tough moment and they really just let it all hang out on the podcast – and you’re like ‘Wow, this person’s being real, this person’s being genuine’.
Kate:
Yeah, absolutely. That’s how people are going to connect with you, that’s how you’re really going to attract your avatar, that’s how you’re really going to get to know who your audience is and what you should be providing to them through just really being yourself. Certain people are going to be attracted to that because of who you are. If you can’t play who you are, then you’re never going to find your target audience.
Harry:
The most important thing – I was talking to my friend who’s looking to start a podcast and he wants a target. He’s a corporate American and he wants to target the leverage relationships that he has with CEOs and some other C-level executives. He was telling me all the aspects of what his plan was, and he said ‘Yeah, a lot of people might be doing it’. I said ‘Look, at the end of the day, even if 100 people are doing it, no-one has the unique combination of your life history, where you grew up, where you were born, who your parents were, where you went to school, what neighborhood you grew in. The minute you start adding in all those variables, you come up with this super unique DNA of who you are, and no-one – even if they tried – could replicate that. You could take 10 people, give them the 10 subjects, even give them the 10 same guests and all 10 people will probably sound completely different and come at it from a different perspective.
Kate:
Yeah, it’s super powerful. I think that that’s a great message to be sending to new podcasters who are just starting out. A lot of it’s in the story telling and your ability to bring something unique to the table, and what better way to do that than to just be you. Nobody else is you.
Harry:
Well, we’ll wrap up in a little bit here, but I was wondering what you think some of the biggest opportunities are for podcasters in the upcoming year.
Kate:
Wow. That’s a big question! I think that there’s a big opportunity in the podcasting space to really play what we were just talking about. There’s a lot of people that have been inspired to start a podcast because they think that it’s going to make them a lot of money, or they think that they can grow an audience really super fast. I think that there’s a great opportunity for people who approach a podcast in the way that I believe a podcast should be approached, which is creating incredible content. Whether that just be through the knowledge that you’re sharing or through the production quality that you have, or through the guests and the connections that you’re able to make.
There’s a lot of different ways to go about it, you don’t have to be perfect in every single one of them, but if you look at the shows that are topping charts right now, a lot of them are NPR and of course, they have resources and the ability to do a lot of things that maybe not everybody can do, let’s be honest.
Harry:
Yeah.
Kate:
But they’ve found a niche in this storytelling, production quality, in a unique spin on entertaining people. I think that there is an opportunity in the podcasting space to really step it up a notch and not just start a podcast because you have knowledge that you want to share with a specific group of people, but start a podcast because you have a unique and awesome way of sharing that content. Make it good! Don’t just launch a podcast and talk about anything; make it good.
Harry:
Take pride in your work, right?
Kate:
Yeah, absolutely. You’ve taken a subject that is obviously very popular and you’ve put your own unique spin on it by just talking to the people that are behind the podcast. Nobody else is doing that. There’s so many possibilities and for people who are just creating podcasts that are already out there, yes you can put your own unique spin on them because you’re you – we just talked about that – but there’s got to be something else to it. I don’t really know that there’s a formula to follow or something to teach people in this, but just the idea that there are people out there, doing really amazing things with podcasting, and it’s not because they’re copying what somebody else is doing.
Harry:
A lot of times it’s because they’re totally ignoring what everybody else is doing!
Kate:
Right, yeah, they’re doing the exact opposite.
Harry:
So I want to thank you for coming on, I’m really happy that we got a chance to talk and I’m looking forward to meeting up a couple more times in person. I think I’m going to try to make it out to that conference. At the very least, we’re going to see each other at Podcast Movement, so I’m pretty excited about that.
Kate:
Awesome, I will definitely look forward to it. I’m excited to hang out in person again.
Harry:
And you’re going to be at Tropical ThinkTank in May, right? You were talking about your upcoming speaking appearances.
Kate:
Yeah, are you doing that?
Harry:
No, I’m not.
Kate:
Oh, that would be cool.
Harry:
For those that don’t know, Tropical ThinkTank is Chris Tucker’s event in the conveniently located Philippines.
Kate:
Right? So close to everything!
Harry:
No, actually I think to paraphrase Dave Jackson – because of my podcast, I’ve been able to network with people and I’ve been motivated to start a conference. I think I mentioned it in Podcasters’ Paradise, so my conference is actually in May. It’s going to be a one-day productivity conference.
Kate:
Oh, that is awesome! Good for you! Where is it going to be?
Harry:
In Los Angeles.
Kate:
Oh, that’s awesome, that’s really cool.
Harry:
Yeah, it’s May 9th and I’ve been able to have Mike Vardy speaking, Natalie Sisson, Jordan Harbinger.
Kate:
Wow!
Harry:
It’s all because of the connections through the podcast, so it’s fantastic. I’m really excited and again, a year and a half ago, I wasn’t even on the radar.
Kate:
Congratulations, way to go.
Harry:
Thank you so much. Thanks for your time again. I’m in the East Coast today, so we’re dealing with like 15-20 degree weather here. I imagine you’re going to have a much sunnier day than I will today.
Kate:
Well, if it makes you feel any better, it is foggy here.
Harry:
Foggy and 70.
Kate:
Yeah.
Harry:
Alright Kate, I’m giving you a great big virtual hug across the screen.
Kate:
Aw, thanks Harry, it was awesome to connect with you. Thank you so much for having me on and thank you to everyone who’s listening that make our podcasts possible.
Harry:
Oh, and the best place to check you out?
Kate:
To check me out, is that what you said?
Harry:
Yes.
Kate:
OKay. www.EOFire.com
Harry:
And you’re on Twitter too, right?
Kate:
Yup, and it’s @KateLErickson